UPDATED: Western Australia opens to California table grapes

07/31/2013 10:19:00 AM
Vicky Boyd

They found that the risks associated with phomopsis and fanleaf virus were negligible and very low, respectively, according to the national department’s July 18 announcement of non-regulatory status.

Both levels met the country’s appropriate level of protection, so no further biosecurity measures were required of the imports.

Doug Gubler, a University of California-Davis, plant pathologist professor, agreed and said the chances of table grapes carrying phomopsis is “very, very minimal.”

“I’ve only seen fruit infected at the station when I caused it, and we’ve never seen fruit or rachis infected in California as far as I know,” he said, adding the disease causes leaf spots and lesions on spurs and canes.


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Vance    
Arizona  |  August, 06, 2013 at 01:44 PM

Phytosanitary certificates are not worth the paper they are written on. I know this because a relative of mine used to write them. Most inspectors trained to write phytos don't know one plant disease from another much less be able to identify it on a packed carton of fresh product. The only way to ensure that a plant disease is not on a product is to have it examined by a qualified Plant Pathologist. Inspectors also are not trained in insect identification unless they are qualified Entomologists. It might be helpful if USDA APHIS would train the inspectors in plant disease identification and insect identification for the crops they inspect the most in the area of the country where they live.

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