Researchers show irradiation kills salmonella on spinach

01/03/2013 12:40:00 PM
Coral Beach

In 2008 the Food and Drug Administration published a final rule allowing irradiation of iceberg lettuce and fresh spinach, saying the treatment makes the leafy greens safer and extends shelf life.

The FDA also stated that the nutrient value of the leafy greens was not decreased by irradiation.


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Joseph Heckman    
New Jersey  |  January, 04, 2013 at 09:21 AM

I will not eat irradiated food.

M. Wilson    
January, 06, 2013 at 04:04 PM

The wholesomeness of leafy greens IS decreased by radiation: J. Agric. Food Chem., 2010, 58 (8), pp 4901–4906 DOI: 10.1021/jf100146m " However, total ascorbic acid (vitamin C), free ascorbic acid, lutein/zeaxanthin, violaxanthin, and β-carotene all were significantly reduced at 2.0 kGy and, depending on cultivar, were affected at lesser doses of 0.5 and 1.5 kGy. Dihydroascorbic acid, the most affected compound and an indicator of stress, likely due to irradiation-generated oxidative radicals, increased with increasing irradiation doses >0.5 kGy." I won't be wasting my money on irradiated foods, especially organically grown food. Food irradiation suggests filth and greed for extened shelf-life to me.

Nature Tech Solutions Inc    
Dillsburg, PA  |  January, 08, 2013 at 01:06 PM

This is why we created a wash that is 80-220 more effective than chlorine, without the corrosive effects. Killing salmonella, E-Coli, and many other pathogens. Made from salt, water, and electric, you can achieve better effects for only pennies a gallon. To my knowledge, there has not been any comprehensive, long term study on the effects of irradiating food. The effects it has on a molecular level. and on the end users. Our technology uses the same chemistry that is already in your body to kill pathogens.

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